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Writing Horror: Scary Writing Prompt Game #17

Happy Thursday, Spookies!

Welcome to another round of the scary writing prompt game. Again, here's how it works: I'll announce the prompt, then you guys post your response in the comment section. At the beginning of each round, I'll share my favorite bits from the previous month's entries before announcing the next prompt. At the end of the year there will be a spooky prize drawing for two lucky winners. *All* participants are automatically entered to win!

Last month's prompt didn't garner any participation, so let's move right along to the prompt for May!

This Month's Prompt:

After making sure that her bedroom door was locked, Nadia stared at the materials that were spread out over her floor: some clumps of hair, the tooth of a wolf, a green silk scarf, and a glass jar. The book said that the hair and tooth were necessary for all Witch Jars, but it was the color of the scarf that was interchangeable for different needs. At first Nadia had considered using a red scarf--her summon was fueled by anger, after all--but in the end she knew that the spell would likely be more accurate if the scarf was as green as the envy that pulsed through her veins every single day.

"Stupid Janice Brent," Nadia whispered under her breath as she stuffed all the materials inside the jar. "That scholarship was my only way out of this town, and you took it from me."

Photo courtesy of Kenn W. Kiser
The woman at the occult shop had warned Nadia against summoning a jar witch without a proper reason. "I want to curse somebody," Nadia had replied, and the woman asked who. Nadia explained about Janice Brent, and the scholarship, and how Janice didn't even need the money even though she still got it.

"She stole it from me," Nadia said curtly to the occult shop owner. "And now I'm going to make her pay."

The woman shook her head and took the book out of Nadia's hands. "I will not sell this to you," the woman told her. "Jar witches are only to be summoned seriously, for serious ordeals. A called-upon witch would be less than pleased to discover that her caller had no other purpose than petty revenge."

Nadia tried to reason with the shop owner, but was turned away anyway. Luckily she had read the passage about the jar witches thoroughly before heading to the front of the shop. She thought she could remember everything necessary to summon the witch, who would grant her a single favor in return for the contents of the jar.

Now that everything was in the jar, it was time. Once all the materials have been placed inside, the book said, whisper your favor into the glass jar and seal it immediately, then place it outside your window and wait for nightfall.

"I want you to take care of Janice Brent," Nadia whispered into the jar. "Drown her, scare her to death, change her into a mouse for all I care. I want her gone."

Then she quickly screwed the lid on the jar and looked inside. The tooth was pressed against the bottom of the jar, held in place by the green scarf. Wispy strands of hair swirled around the fabric like vines. Nadia went outside and carefully set the jar on the ground right below her window. Then she went back into her room, sprawled out on her bed, and waited. Finally the sun went down, making Nadia's pulse race with a terrible sort of excitement. She waited and waited, nearly falling asleep in the process.

Suddenly there came the sound of the jar breaking outside. Nadia jumped awake, remembering very specifically that the book didn't mention the jar being broken, only collected. What was going on?

"Hello?" Nadia called in the direction of the open window. "Who's out there?"

*

Unleash the Hellhounds!
Amy Lukavics

Amy lurks within the forested mountains of Arizona. When she isn't reading or writing creepy stories, she enjoys cooking, crafting, and playing games across many platforms. She is the author of Daughters Unto Devils (Harlequin Teen 2015) and The Women In The Walls (Harlequin Teen 2016).

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4 comments:

  1. "Who dare calls with such a selfish favor?"

    The voice didn't come from anyone or anything in the room. Instead, it was brutally forced into head, filling her mind so completely Nadia thought her eyes world burst from the pressure.

    “I did,” Nadia managed to say. “Janice Brent took what was mine. I want you to punish her.”

    The shadows darkening the corner of Nadia’s room became impossibly black. A tall, reed-thin woman glided toward Nadia. Her skin was as thin and frail as parchment paper. She was bald, her eyes black.

    “None of this was in the book,” Nadia thought. Her heart slammed painfully against her rib cage and sweat coated her palms. She swallowed around the scream threatening to claw its way out of her throat. “Can you help me?”

    The witch drifted closer. The scent of a dying campfire assaulted Nadia’s nostrils.
    It is done.
    “That’s it?” Nadia followed the witch’s smoky form as she drifted over the jar. The contents vanished. “I didn't see you wave a wand or—”

    A surge of white-hot pain cut Nadia off mid-sentence. She clutched her head and dropped to her knees. Her vision blurred, and then doubled. Her stomach cramped and her lungs ached. Nadia felt like she was being squeezed to death by an invisible fist.

    “There,” the witch whispered. “Now what is Janice’s will be yours…forever.”

    The witch disappeared into the shadows, leaving only smudges of ash behind.

    “Come back,” Nadia gasped. She crawled toward the wastebasket and emptied her stomach into it.

    "Help me!" A shrill voice tore through her brain.

    Nadia grabbed fistfuls of her hair and squeezed her eyes shut but the voice wouldn't stop.

    "What’s happening? Help!"

    Nadia pried her eyes open and grabbed her desk. She pulled herself onto her feet and stared at her reflection in an oval mirror. The effort from standing sucked the air out of her cramped lungs. She breathed hard against the glass, squinting as the fog cleared.

    The waiting scream was finally released as familiar ice blue eyes blinked back at Nadia….Her own chocolate brown eyes nowhere to be found.

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  2. Aaaah Jenna, this was marvelous!! Love, love, love it.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Boots clicked on pavement. Down the street walked a shadowy figure wearing a green scarf. It had a long mane of red hair—the same color as Nadia’s—wafting in the breeze.

    Heart still racing, Nadia pulled on her sneakers and went outside. She followed the witch, sticking to the trees along the sidewalk. The book didn’t say anything about talking to the witch. Best to let her finish the mission.

    It was a long walk to Janice’s, who lived north of the highway in Prairie Bluffs. The only time Nadia had been to there before was on take-your-daughter-to-work day when she helped paint the house across from Janice’s. When Janice and her dad arrived in their Audi, Nadia and her dad were packing up the truck for the day. Janice—in her dress pants and blouse—smiled and waved at Nadia. Nadia’s dad waved back, but she just shrugged, her arms weighed down by paint cans.

    When the witch reached Janice’s house, Nadia hid behind a tree at that house. The witch raised a hand toward Janice’s window. Janice was inside, a dress held to her body. She’s choosing her outfit for the scholarship dinner. Nadia’s blood boiled, heart pounding in her chest. Nadia emerged from behind the tree. It was time. Janice opened her window.

    “Nadia! You must be on quite a walk,” said Janice. “Do you want to come in and get some water?”

    Nadia’s palms itched. A sweaty film coated her body. The witch raised her other hand. Maybe only the summoner could see her. “I’m doing great. Better than you.”

    “Good news? What’s up?” asked Janice. “Here, I’ll come downstairs.”

    A moment later Janice was crossing her front lawn, barefoot. Janice said, “It’s a nice night for a walk, isn’t it? I’m glad I saw you. I have an invitation to my graduation party for you. I’d really like you to come.”

    Janice crossed the street, walking right through the witch. She extended the invitation to Nadia. Maybe Nadia was wrong. Janice probably didn’t even know that Nadia had applied for that scholarship. Only a loser would know another person who applied—the winner. Nadia didn’t know how to call off the witch now. Then she read the invitation. It listed the five scholarships Janice had won. Her dad ran a bank! They lived on piles of money. It wasn’t fair.

    Through gritted teeth Nadia handed back the invitation and said, “I’m not coming to your stupid party, because you’re not going to make it that far.”

    A hurt look crossed Janice’s face just before she vanished.

    Nadia let out a yelp of joy then covered her mouth. She whispered to the witch, “What happened to her?” Nadia scratched her palm again, heart still racing. She wrinkled her nose. Now it was itchy.

    The witch smirked. “Gone.” Her teeth were too big for her mouth, wolf’s teeth.
    “But you didn’t drown her or turn her into a mouse or really even scare her like I suggested. Where did she go?” Nadia asked, approaching the witch.

    The witch’s tongue ran along her fangs. Nadia grew nervous, but she was sure the witch had to do what she said. If only her heart would slow down. “College.”

    “You sent her to college?! That’s just going to weird her out, and then she’ll come back here, collect her money and go for real!” Nadia balled her hands into fists.

    “Sh,” said the witch. She placed one finger on Nadia’s forehead. Good. The witch was sending her to college too. Maybe she threw in an extra wish because she understood Nadia’s situation.

    Nadia appeared back at home, lying prone on her bed. She sniffed her bedspread. Detergent. Wait. She was doing something else before that had nothing to do with how her bedspread smelled. The jar!

    She tried to get up, but could only raise her body a centimeter. In her mirror, a red mouse stared back at her. Her pulse couldn’t race any faster now. Its speed actually felt comfortable. Instead, her red fur turned white. She had to get to the window, to the witch for help. She crawled to the edge of the bed and took a short, deep breath. She would have to jump down to the floor.

    As she sailed through the air, she flopped to avoid her landing. Her water glass sat on the floor beside her bed.

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  4. Boots clicked on pavement. Down the street walked a shadowy figure wearing a green scarf. It had a long mane of red hair—the same color as Nadia’s—wafting in the breeze.

    Heart still racing, Nadia pulled on her sneakers and went outside. She followed the witch, sticking to the trees along the sidewalk. The book didn’t say anything about talking to the witch. Best to let her finish the mission.

    It was a long walk to Janice’s, who lived north of the highway in Prairie Bluffs. The only time Nadia had been to there before was on take-your-daughter-to-work day when she helped paint the house across from Janice’s. When Janice and her dad arrived in their Audi, Nadia and her dad were packing up the truck for the day. Janice—in her dress pants and blouse—smiled and waved at Nadia. Nadia’s dad waved back, but she just shrugged, her arms weighed down by paint cans.

    When the witch reached Janice’s house, Nadia hid behind a tree at that house. The witch raised a hand toward Janice’s window. Janice was inside, a dress held to her body. She’s choosing her outfit for the scholarship dinner. Nadia’s blood boiled, heart pounding in her chest. Nadia emerged from behind the tree. It was time. Janice opened her window.

    “Nadia! You must be on quite a walk,” said Janice. “Do you want to come in and get some water?”

    Nadia’s palms itched. A sweaty film coated her body. The witch raised her other hand. Maybe only the summoner could see her. “I’m doing great. Better than you.”

    “Good news? What’s up?” asked Janice. “Here, I’ll come downstairs.”

    A moment later Janice was crossing her front lawn, barefoot. Janice said, “It’s a nice night for a walk, isn’t it? I’m glad I saw you. I have an invitation to my graduation party for you. I’d really like you to come.”

    Janice crossed the street, walking right through the witch. She extended the invitation to Nadia. Maybe Nadia was wrong. Janice probably didn’t even know that Nadia had applied for that scholarship. Only a loser would know another person who applied—the winner. Nadia didn’t know how to call off the witch now. Then she read the invitation. It listed the five scholarships Janice had won. Her dad ran a bank! They lived on piles of money. It wasn’t fair.

    Through gritted teeth Nadia handed back the invitation and said, “I’m not coming to your stupid party, because you’re not going to make it that far.”

    A hurt look crossed Janice’s face just before she vanished.

    Nadia let out a yelp of joy then covered her mouth. She whispered to the witch, “What happened to her?” Nadia scratched her palm again, heart still racing. She wrinkled her nose. Now it was itchy.

    The witch smirked. “Gone.” Her teeth were too big for her mouth, wolf’s teeth.
    “But you didn’t drown her or turn her into a mouse or really even scare her like I suggested. Where did she go?” Nadia asked, approaching the witch.

    The witch’s tongue ran along her fangs. Nadia grew nervous, but she was sure the witch had to do what she said. If only her heart would slow down. “College.”

    “You sent her to college?! That’s just going to weird her out, and then she’ll come back here, collect her money and go for real!” Nadia balled her hands into fists.

    “Sh,” said the witch. She placed one finger on Nadia’s forehead. Good. The witch was sending her to college too. Maybe she threw in an extra wish because she understood Nadia’s situation.

    Nadia appeared back at home, lying prone on her bed. She sniffed her bedspread. Detergent. Wait. She was doing something else before that had nothing to do with how her bedspread smelled. The jar!

    She tried to get up, but could only raise her body a centimeter. In her mirror, a red mouse stared back at her. Her pulse couldn’t race any faster now. Its speed actually felt comfortable. Instead, her red fur turned white. She had to get to the window, to the witch for help. She crawled to the edge of the bed and took a short, deep breath. She would have to jump down to the floor.

    As she sailed through the air, she flopped to avoid her landing. Her water glass sat on the floor beside her bed.

    ReplyDelete

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Item Reviewed: Writing Horror: Scary Writing Prompt Game #17 Rating: 5 Reviewed By: Amy Lukavics