By George, There's a Book in You!

please excuse the very crappy quality. it's a cell phone picture.**
It's the beginning of the semester and my theory professors have me reading this incredibly dense book to prep for the rest of the year. I haven't made it past the introduction (it's really dense!) but I was really struck by something she mentioned in her introduction: "there's a book in there....You may not see it, but it's there."*

She goes on to talk about a split and Foucault and to be honest, things that are interesting but not really relevant to this post. But her moment (or moments) of struggle with bringing this hulking book to completion and print and trying to make it make sense really resonated with me (low as I am in the synopsis writing depths).

It's easy to get lost in the plotting and the writing and the fear. It's easy to get caught up in the mess that your book can become halfway (or a third of the way) through, and forget there's an end to the tunnel. And so it's useful to say to yourself or have it said to you: There's a book in you. Even if it's messy and not well formed and kind of lopsided, there's still a book in you. And that's important to remember when you're lost, or you can't tell what the end will look like. It's important during those awful moments of wondering can you even do this writing thing (you definitely can) or why you should bother (because you don't know any other way).

Because we all have a book in us and the difference between us and the rest of the world is that we choose to sit down and share that book with everyone else (or at least the computer).

*Many thanks to Lynne Huffer who wrote Made for Foucault: Rethinking the Foundations of Queer Theory because even though it's dense, it's one of the best theory books I've read.
**And also thanks to Tom Wilson and Tom II who's comic is featured above. The picture is taken from my copy of Mad for Foucault.




6 comments:

  1. When sculptors receive a lump of clay, marble or wood they have to find its ‘true form’, and writers do the same thing. Writers chisel out the story because it’s already there in existence, you just have to find it and let it take form.

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  2. This is a really good pep talk post. It can be hard at times to remember what you're supposed to be doing when you write, which way to go, what your goals were when you started -- but you have to finish it either way or else you'd regret it. Thanks for the great post!

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  3. I like your point. Everyone might have a book in them, but ultimately, it is only those who actually sit down and write it who are ... well, 'writers'.

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  4. I really needed those words. I have been spending a lot of time n fear and doubt lately and it feels good to hear that.
    Susan at Pen and Ink

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  5. Very encouraging words and just what I needed to hear this week. So great that I listed it as one of the top blog posts for this week on my blog.
    http://simplyscribblings.blogspot.ca/2013/01/the-weather-cant-seem-to-make-up-its.html
    Thank you for encouraging us.

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  6. Don't worry it happens a lot and more over we are humans, so we can't expect a flow in the writing.

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